Feeling Down and Overwhelmed by Life’s Challenges? 19 Steps to End Worrying.

 

pexels-photo-626165

 

“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.” —Albert Einstein.

Hello my friends!

Worry is a form of thinking.  How we worry can either be constructive or destructive. Worrying is feeling uneasy or being overly concerned about a situation or problem. With excessive worrying, your mind and body go into overdrive as you constantly focus on “what might happen.” Sometimes, a little worry or anxiety is helpful. It can help you get ready for an upcoming situation. But excessive worry or ongoing fear or anxiety is harmful when it becomes so irrational that you can’t focus on reality or think clearly.

Chronic worry and emotional stress can trigger a host of health problems. The fight or flight response causes the body’s sympathetic nervous system to release stress hormones such as cortisol. These hormones can cause physical reactions such as:
Difficulty swallowing
Dizziness
Dry mouth
Fast heartbeat
Fatigue
Headaches
Inability to concentrate
Irritability
Muscle aches
Muscle tension
Nausea
Shortness of breath.

There are 19 steps you can do to stop the pattern of excess worry and live a happier life.

1.Identify your stress situations and what you’re worried about.

2. Make time for Faith. “ The simplicity of our life of contemplation makes us see the face of God in everything, everyone, and everywhere, all the time”. Mother Teresa.

3. Challenge Your Beliefs About Worry.

What is the evidence that the thought is true? That it’s not true?
Is there a more positive, realistic way of looking at the situation?
What’s the probability that what I’m scared of will actually happen? If the probability is low, what are some more likely outcomes?
Is the thought helpful? How will worrying about it help me and how will it hurt me?
What would I say to a friend who had this worry?

4. Practice Realistic Thinking.

5. Write down your worries.

6. Setting aside a certain amount of time (10-15 minutes) each day to consider worries and avoiding thinking about them at other times in the day.

7. Make your worries boring. If there is a specific worry that bothers you often, you can try to make it boring, so your brain will return to it less often. Do this by repeating it in your head again and again for several minutes.

8. Interrupt negative thought loops and replace them with positive ones.

9. Think of how to solve the problem. Knowing what to do if a dreaded event does occur can help reduce the anxiety that develops from an imagined scenario.

10. Think about social influences. Emotions can be contagious. If you spend a lot of time with other worriers, or people who make you anxious, you may want to reconsider how much time you are spending with those people.

11. Accept the Things You Cannot Change.

12. Embrace uncertainty.

13. Try not to isolate yourself. Develop deep relations.

14. Get moving.

15. Take a yoga or tai chi class.

16. Try deep breathing.

17. Meditate.

18. Stay focused on the present.

19. Practice progressive muscle relaxation.

And always remember:

“You’re only here for a short visit. Don’t hurry, don’t worry. And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.” —Walter Hagen.

Love always,

Vassiliki xxxx

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About vassilikiplomaritouhttps://mygreatteacheruk.wordpress.comHi, and thanks for visiting! My blog is a good place to find out more about me and my books. I am Vassiliki Plomaritou, a Greek mum of an amazing 27 years old girl and of a pug called Pumba. We live in Richmond, Surrey, a place that I was dreaming about for over 10 years. I wish the rest of my family was here with us, I miss them everyday and especially my little niece, Anna Maria. I love exploring new places such as parks, castles and villages with my husband, my daughter and my dog. Also, I love books, flowers and films, especially comedies. I am passionate about teaching children emotional intelligence skills that will last a lifetime. I have already published four books about emotional intelligence for children in primary school, a program for reading and spelling difficulties, another one for anxiety, fear and panic attacks and the last one which will be published in January 2019, is about the emotional intelligence of teachers. All of them are in Greek but I promise you that I will publish through my blog some important extracts of my books in English in order to show you all my love and respect. I have published one book in English “Charlie a boy with reading difficulties and his dream” which is an award winning book inspired by the real life of a young boy who experiences learning difficulties due to dyslexia. You can buy my books here and of course they are available in all bookstores in Greece: • The development of the emotional intelligence of primary school children: http://www.grigorisbooks.gr/product/1125/πρόγραμμα-ανάπτυξης-συναισθηματικής-νοημοσύνης • A practical resource for primary school children with reading and spelling difficulties: http://www.grigorisbooks.gr/product/1396/πρόγραμμα-αντιμετώπισης-μαθησιακών-δυσκολιών.-ανάγνωση-και-ορθογραφία • Without fear, without anxiety: http://www.grigorisbooks.gr/product/1670/χωρίς-φόβο-και-άγχος • The last panic attack http://www.grigorisbooks.gr/product/1724/ο-τελευταίος-πανικός If you would like to arrange a seminar on the development of emotional intelligence or a visit in Greek school you can contact me to the following email: plomvasso@gmail.com I will happily give you any information you need! I would love to hear from you! I apologise for not being word-perfect in English as it is not my mother tongue but I will do my best Love always, Vassiliki xxx

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.